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is acting like a dictator. president mohamed morsi granted himself sweeping new powers yesterday, basically morsi now has absolute power for six months. his opponents say he's acting like a new pharaoh. the u.s. state department is calling for calm and encouraging all parties to work together. morsi declared all his laws, all his decrees are final and cannot be overturned or appealed until egypt's new constitution is put in place. just days ago, people around the world were praising morsi for his pivotal role in negotiating the israel/hamas cease-fire. today, protesters set fire to a symbol of morsi's power, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, egypt. morsi supporters clashed with protesters there. morsi is defending his new powers, saying he's not taking sides and the steps he took are meant to achieve political and social stability. reza sayah joins us live in cairo. reza, is morsi's government strong enough, so early in this administration, to withstand this level of protests? >> reporter: well, we're going to find out in the coming weeks, but the political landscape is cer
and more clashes over legal order announced by egyptian president mohammed morsy. we'll tell why you morsy's supporters are calling for a million man demonstration. >>> and a maryland law vofrg the collection of dan evidence goes before the u.s. supreme court in february. it could impact the entire country in many ways. our legal guys are weighing in. and u.s. companies are starting to rethink their off shore manufacturing strategy. we'll find out why one ceo decided to bring jobs back to the u.s. [ male announcer ] this is joe woods' first day of work. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing today? i'm good thanks.
president, mahmoud abbas and then will fly to egypt to speak with president mohamed morsi. that is going to be a very interesting conversation, because, of course, as so many of you are aware, morsi is in a tough situation. many of the people in egypt, obviously, don't support working with israel at all. and within the past hour, there were several explosions in gaza city. let's get straight to our team there. >> obviously, looks like we're having a problem with that shot. we'll be getting there in just a moment. difficult to communicate with them, because of these rockets that have been going off. let's try again. let's go back there to ben. >> here in gaza. there were a few hours of relative quiet. but as we have seen within really the last 15 minutes, an intense attack on a building behind right where i am. it's a complex where we understand there are some government offices, and we understand from other palestinian sources that some of the security personnel who were vacated from other areas, other offices around gaza, may have been working out of that building. so certainly there wa
mohamed morsi. morsi expanded his powers this week, and that means no one can challenge his decisions. they can't be overturned. that's led to anger among the people and some of the judges. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. >> reporter: thanks have calmed down considerably in cairo's tahrir square. still demonstrators out in tahrir, especially those who pitched tents overnight but the numbers not as what we saw on friday, friday one of the most intense and violent days of demonstrations that we've seen since mr. morsi, the egyptian president took office back in june. more than 140 people injured throughout egypt, according to the health ministry, in clashes between protesters and police. a little under 40 people injured in kay row. several with gunshot wounds. also, more than 200 people arrested and many on charges of thuggery and destroying public property. those arrested seem to be younger men who are out looking for trouble, but certainly thousands showed up to express what they call as legitimate and serious concern about mr. morsi's decrees that at least for the time bei
killed. massive crowds at the funeral of a protester who died overnight. fatally injured against morsi's edict. putting his decisions beyond judicial review. ever since he issued it. the streets have looked like this, just like they did when millions rose to overthrow the dictator. this time, the protesters are accusing president morsi of a make ed power grab. today he met with members of the highest judicial body. emerged saying his edict had been clarified. what that clarification really amounts to remains unclear. resa joins us now with the latest. this is this a clarification or is this morsi faced with the protests we've been seeing, trying to save face while scaling back his decree? >> well, wolf, we've spoken to the president's office throughout the day, they say their condition is clear, they're not scaling back on any of these decrees. they seem to be reshaping and refocusing their message. mr. morsi's message now is, with these decrees, i didn't amass sweeping dictatorial powers and my decisions are still open to review by the courts, except for the decision that has to do wi
's apparently wrapped up talk in cairo with president morsi, who this time yesterday was saying a truce, at least a cease-fire of some sorts, was just hours, hours away. let's go to tel aviv. sara sidner is standing by. tell our viewers what happened just a few hours ago. >> reporter: around noon, tel aviv time, there was an explosion on the number 61 bus. it was very close to the military headquarters here, very close to the courts here, along a street that was eventually block off by police. at least 22 people were injured, some of those people were on the bus, some outside the bus. they suffered everything from panic attacks to a couple teenagers who have the worst of the injuries. we talked to the e.r. doctor who told us one of the teenagers may lose a limb, perhaps an arm because of the soft tissue that's been blasted away. also a lot of shrapnel wounds in the face. both may face a lifetime of disability. those are his words. we talked to the police, more still looking for a suspect, trying to find out who was responsible. we saw the bus before testify driven away. all the windows
morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it comes to mediating the deals between the two sides israel has always played a critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the east, is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity here in gaza. and that changed the dynamics and it has changed the way we have been seeing things the way they played out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical test. >> arwa damon, thank you very much. welcome to you. >> thanks for having me. >> can you outline
of thousands of protesters are in tahrir square and other cities calling morsi a dictator and the new pharaoh. he granted himself broad new powers specially allowing him to run the country unchecked. and the truce is facing its first challenge. a palestinian farmer was shot dead when israeli officers shot near the border. first i want to go to cairo and reza sayah who's following all the developments there. just a few moments ago, morsi spoke to a huge crowd. what did he say? >> well, he tried to calm things down. he defended his position. he defended the controversial decrees he announced last night telling his opponents that he's part of the revolution, one of the people. certainly at this hour he's got a lot of opponents and critics who do not agree with him and are are expressing their outrage in the streets. dramatic scenes in cairo. very reminiscent of the scenes we saw during the 2011 egyptian revolution. back then it was aimed at former president hosni mubarak. now aimed at mr. morsi. there were some clashes during the protest in tahrir square that are ongoing. the clashes witnesses s
anti-government protesters are spending the night in tahrir square. they are protesting morsi's decree granting himself unchecked political power. earlier today, protesters threw rocks at police who responded with tear gas, we will have more on this story at the bottom of the hour. and an emergency at the u.s. state department today, fire trucks raced to the department headquarters before noon, a flash fire in the duct work of the building forced everyone to evacuate and sent three people in the hospital, construction workers were among the few in the building because it's a holiday weekend. a gas explosion that damaged more than 40 buildings. a camera captured the moment of the blast. mostly emergency workers were injured. they were called to the scene because of reports of the gas smell. they evacuated most of the area an hour before the explosion. superstorm sandy is at $29 billion at cost. governor chris christie said that the final total will only be known after taking into account next summer's tourist season. it was said this that they would ask the federal government for $30 bi
egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all the demonstrators angry after president morsi declared some controversial decrees that temporaril
trouble. those were chants of down with president morsi, down with president morsi. we're now starting to see these protests and clashes take place in cities outside of cairo. in the northern city, the first fatality of these protests. according to the muslim brotherhood, 15-year-old islam massoud was killed when anti-morsi protesters attacked the brotherhood's offices there. massoud hit in the head with a club and pronounced dead before he arrived at the hospital. this is some of the violence taking place. let's go to tahrir square shall things are a little more peaceful. things much calmer here where you have a few thousand people gathered here. about 40 tents, very much reminiscent of the 2011 egyptian revolution. you have food stands, people selling tea. here is a tea stand right here. lots of people talking politics. if you look at these groups here, these are all people that are debating their political positions and demanding that mr. morsi rescind his controversial decre decrees. >> to start with i want these decrees to be withdrawn and secondly, i would hope he starts to liste
to president mohamed morsi is growing. for a third straight day, protesters hit the streets demanding he rescind a decree that gives him unlimited power. we get more now from cairo. >> reporter: outrage, clashes, and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time, the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsi. >> we're here because we don't want him to rule us anymore. >> it's a one-man show. he wants to do everything. this is nothing at all what we want. >> reporter: on thursday, the new islamist president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says are designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that still is missing a parliament. >> whether it causes anyone to overturn any of the declarations. that's the same place the parliament is born. technically, it means for now he can do wh
the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judiciary by banning anyone -- any authority, even the judiciary, from questioning, appealing any decisions he made since june. the question was going into this meeting, would he scale back on some of those d
to the government in egypt, the president mohamed morsi, that they would stop firing into israel. if that were to be revoked, that would be a violation. they would be breaking their word to the egyptians and that would cause some serious repercussions i assume, christiane, between the egypt government, muslim brotherhood-led government, and hamas. >> reporter: well, i was obviously talking about what's the perspective from this side was. but of course israel's demand was that there would be no more rockets and no more of that fire going into israel. that was something they really wanted. and of course israel does not want to see hamas resupplied through the tunnel network. that is still to be worked out. i asked him whether or not he got weapons and whether hamas was getting weapons from iran, and he gave me a non-confirmation confirmation. it's an open secret that they come through those tunnels. so that has to be taken in hand. we're not sure how that's going to happen, but obviously there is some egyptian role in that as well. but, yes, egypt is the guarantor of this cease-fire. neither sid
the egyptian president mohamed morsi and what they call a power grab. we'll take you live to tahrir square. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. tintroducing a revolutionary. this it new mascara.r aleve. clump crusher...crusher. 200% more volume. zero clumps. new clump crusher from easy, breezy, beautiful covergirl. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophisticated styling begins. and where it ends? that's up to you. it's here -- the greatest malibu ever. ♪ anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and before i reached the top, the board meeting became a congrats we sold the company party. wait til my wife's
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
to breaking news out of cairo, egypt. protesters are outraged at egyptian president mohamed morsi's power grab. thousands have gathered calling it the birth of a new pharaoh. attacking the headquarters of morsi's political party in alexandria and set it on fire according to egyptian tv. reza sayah joins us on the phone from tarir square. set the scene for us. reza, are you there? >> reporter: hello? >> reza, can you hear me? >> reporter: carol, i apologize. it is very loud here. i'm going to have a terribly difficult time hearing you. we are at tahrir square where thousands of people have come to protest against egyptian president mohamed morsi and there appears to be clashes between security forces and protest protesters in tahrir square. we just saw hundreds of people run i running away from security forces. we can report that tear gas has been shot in the air, we're assuming by security forces. it's remarkable here, carol, we're hear iing what we heard t years ago during revolution that toppled president mubarak, that people want to topple the regime. you're hearing it again, the anger and
with palestinian authority president mahmoud abbas and with egyptian president mohammed morsi tomorrow. i want to bring in cnn's wolf blitzer, who is live for us in jerusalem tonight, and anderson cooper and ben wedeman, both in gaza city. wolf, let me start with you if i may. a very tense day with claim and counterclaim coming almost on an hourly basis. there was going to be a cease-fire, then no cease-fire. both sides trading sort of insults and then offering fig leaves. what do you make of it all? as we talk now in the middle of a night there, what do you make of where we really are with this? >> well, throughout most of the day, i thought they were very close to reaching a cease-fire agreement. all the signs looked rather positive. then all of a sudden, on this day, it was getting increasingly more tense in the southern part of israel and what we've been seeing in gaza, very, very bloody as well. you wouldn't know that they are apparently rather close to some sort of a deal, that the egyptian government, the new president, mohammed morsi, seemed to be brokering. they may still get some sor
, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was leaning towards accepting this draft proposal sent by hamas via the egyptian government. so once it was c
, will the celebrations ends and the fear return? for u.s. secretary of state hilary clinton and president morsi, the hope is that the deal will stick. it calls for freedom of movement for palestinians in and out of gaza and a commitment not to target militants and commitment from militant groups in gaza, to halt rocket fire into israel. again, a discussion nothing is a done deal. over the next hour, we'll look at negotiations still happening now, we'll also hear from the spokeswoman for the israeli defense forces and the leader much hamas. plus, a reporter on the ground and whole lot more. we begin with a look at what has transpired over the last 24 hours, and it's remarkable there is a cease-fire at this hour when you consider how this wednesday started off. take a look. at mid day, no sign of a truce when a city bus is bombed in tell aviv, two dozen people twounded. terrorists left two bombs on the bus and fled. only one exploded. hamas praised attack, near the headquarters of the israeli defense forces. farther south, an israeli home hit by a rocket. room after room, left in ruins. according to the is
-year-old activist, and to voice their opposition to president mohamed morsi and the muslim brotherhood. this ireport showing protesters as they carried the teenager's casket through tahrir square to a cemetery. morsi declared the court cannot overturn decisions he has made since coming into office in june. one opponent says it can only lead to a dictatorship. morsi insists that he is trying to protect egypt's fragile arab spring, revolution, not accumulate unchecked power. >>> and if you're traveling through the northeast today, well, you might be dealing with a little bit of snow. meteorologist alexandra steele is in for rob marciano today. what are we looking at, alexandra? >> hey, good morning to you guys. yeah, we are seeing snow, even in new york city. all the big cities, boston, new york, philadelphia, a little snow. not much in the way of accumulation, really along the big cities and the 95 corridor, but still you'll see it come down. kind of get new the christmas spirit. we do have winter weather advisories and we will see accumulati accumulations. want to show you where. here'
almost two years ago, the demonstrators are voicing their anger with president mohamed morsi after what some are calling an unprecedented power grab. cnn's reza sayah is joining us from cairo once again. reza, we're hearing about attacks against several muslim brotherhood offices in egypt. what do you know about that? >> reporter: according to the brotherhood spokesperson, two of their offices were attacked by anti-morsi protesters. the brotherhood says the protesters were carrying molotov cocktails, clubs and knives and destroyed and heavily damaged these offices. remember, muslim brotherhood had called for a one-million-man demonstration of their own today to rival the opposition's demonstrations. late last night they called it off to avoid violence. but in these two particular cities north of cairo, they didn't avoid violence. >> reza, we're also seeing and i want to show our viewers some live pictures from tahrir square in cairo not far from where you are right now. you were there earlier in the day. who are these protesters? and there are huge numbers there. we see the tents. what'
as recenters protest over what they consider a power grab. morsi announced late last week that egyptian courts could not overturn any law he has issued since taking power in june. opposition protesters have called for a sit-in in tahir jair while the muslim brotherhood said they will stage nationwide demonstrations in support of morsi's plans. >>> as the truce holds between hamas and israel for if fourth day, president mahmoud abbas is confident. palestinian factions are supporting the effort but the others are opposing it. >>> finally lotto fever. lottery officials say there were no winners in last night's power lottery pushing this week's jackpot to under $425 million. that's the largest jackpot ever for the game. those are your top stories. now back to "fareed zakaria gps." >>> we live in a borderless world, right, where globalization, inper dependence, and economics are reshaping the way companies and countries cooperate. not quite, says robert kaplan. he's written a book called "the revenge of geography: what the map tells us about coming conflicts and the battle of flight." >> he joins m
morsi, a man we've seen at rallies where egyptians chan egyptians chanted we are hamas. it's an impressive feat and the first time that israel has ever negotiated with an islamist government. but there are some shady things about the deal. according to an israeli newspaper, neither side officially signed penned to paper on the cease-fire agreement which raise sometimes questions about it. and here's what we know is in the verbal deal. israel has agreed to hold its fire and end attacks against top militants and this is important, promise to look at ways to ease its blockade of the gaza border. hamas agreed not to strike any israeli targets and agreed there is no passage of weapons into gaza and to insure other palestinian groups in the gaza strip stop their attacks. if you're shaking your head that some of these things are very tall order, well, you're right. later "out front" we have the key players, israel's foreign deputy minister and leerd of the plo to the united states. they will be our guests and answer those questions. but cnn's ben wheatamen is live with the latest
the new president. tear gas was fired to disperse demonstrators. many say mohamed morsi betrayed the democratic intention of arab spring when he granted himself sweeping new powers last week. we'll keep an eye on cairo and bring you new developments as they happen. >>> as early as today, we could hear from the u.s. soldier accused of leaking thousands of military and diplomatic secrets to wikileaks. bradley manning says military jailers mistreat ed him for nearly a year. if his attorneys can prove that, his case could be dismissed. if not, manning could face life in prison if convicted. >>> also this morning, forensic experts have what they need to determine if former palestinian leader yasser arafat may have been poisoned eight years ago. just hours ago, they exhumed his body, took samples from the remains and then reburied him. fred pleitgen has been following the developments from the west bank. morning, fred. >> reporter: good morning, carol. the process only lasted a few hours. early in the morning hours, the grave, the tomb of yasser arafat was opened, all of this closed of
because morsi hails from the brotherhood, a political cousin to hamas. we are joined from cairo. how are egyptians feeling about this cease-fire this morning? >> reporter: well, if you're the leadership of the muslim brotherhood in cairo you're patting yourself on the back today because they really came out looking very favorably in the international community throughout this process. this is a big test for egypt's government led now but the muslim brotherhood. a talk show host had a lot of concern. would this be a movement that would take up arms? would this be a movement that would give material support for hamas. it turns out that those fears, the way things stand right now turned out to be groundless. it looks like this is a government that's approached this very even handedly to keep their peace treaty and their economic alliances with washington and western capitals. in the end it doesn't look like this is a government that wanted to be seen as radical in the community. >>> back at home u.s. ambassador susan rice is speaking out about those talking points that she delivered on
today in cairo where president morsi's move to extend his own powers. police fired tear gas at egyptian protesters gathered near tahrir square. israel's cabinet chief says there will be no retreat from the presidential decree. >>> tomorrow president barack obama and governor mitt romney will have a private lunch at the white house. cnn has also learned mitt romney will meet with his former running mate congressman paul ryan of wisconsin. >>> to to politics now. today might be your lucky day. the obama administration is taking its tax fight to twitter asking you to speak out on the bush tax cuts using the hash tag my2k. that is the estimated amount in tax hikes the administration says a middle class family of four could face if the bush tax cuts expire on the middle class. but the white house isn't limiting its efforts to social media. president obama is heading to pennsylvania on friday where he'll make his pitch to extend existing tax breaks for families making $250,000 or less. joining me now cnn contributor granderson and republican strategist ron bonjean. welcome to both of you. >>
mohamed morsi's move to consolidate his power. the muslim brotherhood is supporting nationwide rallies to support the president. the new constitution meantime says it has almost finished its final draft. and the e.p.a. is temporarily banning bp from competing for new government contracts. in the wake of the 2010 gulf oil spill, the agency says it is taking action because of bp's "lack of business integrity." as of february bp had $9 billion in contracts with the feds. bp it expects this ban to be lifted shortly. and the manager who oversaw apple's flawed maps program on its new iphone has been fired. rich williamson was fired just before the thanksgiving holiday. he had been with apple for about a decade. the flawed maps app forced ceo tim cook to issue a public apology after the iphone's debut in september. and if you've ever dreamed of an intimate dinner with betty white, well here is your chance. a los angeles chapter of the society for the prevention of cruel tito animals is auctioning off a date with the actress. the winner will join white and the spca's president for dinner. the
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)